Teaching

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Semester: Second
Year: 2017
Institution: King’s College London
Position: Lecturer

M.A. in Public Policy Dissertation Module
Semester: First
Year: 2016
Institution: King’s College London
Position: Lecturer, Convenor

M.A. in Political Economy Dissertation Module
Semester: First
Year: 2016
Institution: King’s College London
Position: Lecturer, Convenor

Economic Approaches to History
Term: Michaelmas
Year: 2016
Course Description: The aim of this Approach is to introduce students to the ways in which economic models and statistical sources can be used to understand history. It encourages students to tackle the central issue of how economic development has changed the character and quality of human life and, to this end, to look at the ways in which political, social, and cultural institutions have determined long-run economic and demographic outcomes, and simultaneously been determined by them. The course takes a global perspective, with particular attention to the analysis of cross-country and cross-time differences in capital and labour market institutions and technological change, and the effects of those differences on economic and human development. In the course of these four lectures, students will be introduced to economic approaches to collecting and using quantitative historical data to identify causal links between historical factors and economic outcomes.
Institution: University of Oxford
Position: Lecturer

Economic and Quantitative History
Semester: Trinity
Year: 2016
Institution: University of Oxford
Position: Tutor

Economic Systems, Development, Globalisation
Semester: Trinity
Year: 2016
Institution: University of Oxford
Position: Tutor

Economic Approaches to History
Semester: Michaelmas
Year: 2015
Course Description: The aim of this Approach is to introduce students to the ways in which economic models and statistical sources can be used to understand history. It encourages students to tackle the central issue of how economic development has changed the character and quality of human life and, to this end, to look at the ways in which economics has tried to define and measure concepts such as character and quality. The course can be approached both by taking a broad perspective on the economic evolution of the globe and by looking at specific thematic issues and case studies in different periods, for example the role of technological change. As with the other Approaches, it is organized around four broad themes. In the course of these students will be introduced to the grand theories of economic development expounded by Adam Smith, Robert Malthus and Karl Marx; the ways in which historians have sought to apply, refine, or refute these grand theories in the light of evidence from different times and places can be closely assessed.
Institution: University of Oxford
Position: Lecturer, Tutor

An Introduction to the History of Economic Thought
Semester: Fall
Year: 2011
Course Description: The course provides an introduction to the history of economic thought, from Aristotle to Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Paul Samuelson; and to economic concepts in historical perspective, from the state and the market to natural resources and financial crises.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Fellow

Historical Perspectives on Economic Ascendancy
Semester: Fall
Year: 2010
Course Description: An introduction to economic history broadly construed, focusing on economic growth and development. Covers topics such as the industrial revolution,institutions and property rights, financial markets and regulation, the 1930s Great Depression, migration and labor markets, inequality, health, and environmental change. Emphasis on students learning to generate and implement ideas for new research.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Fellow

Principles of Economics
Semester: Summer
Year: 2008
Course Description: This course covers both micro- and macroeconomics. The microeconomic subjects studied include the workings of the market mechanisms—how supply and demand determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and international trade, and how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention. The macroeconomic subjects include the determinants of economic growth, financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy.
Institution: Harvard University (Summer School)
Position: Teaching Assistant

The U.S. Labor Market
Semester: Spring
Year: 2008
Course Description: Presents the tools employed in research on the operation of the labor market and then uses them to discuss issues such as the determinants of earnings differentials, the impact of various firm characteristics on labor-market outcomes, discrimination, and unemployment.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Assistant

The Indebted Society
Semester: Fall
Year: 2007
Course Description: In recent years, the U.S. economy has entered an unprecedented era of dependence on debt by governments, corporations and households. A massive debt overhang permeates our economy, casting a shadow over government, corporate and household finance and shaping decision-making processes for all of these actors. This course examines both causes and effects of this penchant for debt, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach drawing from labor economics, public/corporate finance, law, public policy, and even sociology and psychology.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Assistant

Principles of Economics
Semester: Summer
Year: 2007
Course Description: This course covers both micro- and macroeconomics. The microeconomic subjects studied include the workings of the market mechanisms—how supply and demand determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and international trade, and how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention. The macroeconomic subjects include the determinants of economic growth, financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy.
Institution: Harvard University (Summer School)
Position: Teaching Assistant

The U.S. Labor Market
Semester: Spring
Year: 2007
Course Description: Presents the tools employed in research on the operation of the labor market and then uses them to discuss issues such as the determinants of earnings differentials, the impact of various firm characteristics on labor-market outcomes, discrimination, and unemployment.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Assistant

The Indebted Society
Semester: Fall
Year: 2006
Course Description: In recent years, the U.S. economy has entered an unprecedented era of dependence on debt by governments, corporations and households. A massive debt overhang permeates our economy, casting a shadow over government, corporate and household finance and shaping decision-making processes for all of these actors. This course examines both causes and effects of this penchant for debt, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach drawing from labor economics, public/corporate finance, law, public policy, and even sociology and psychology.
Institution: Harvard University
Position: Teaching Assistant

Principles of Economics
Semester: Summer
Year: 2006
Course Description: This course covers both micro- and macroeconomics. The microeconomic subjects studied include the workings of the market mechanisms—how supply and demand determine the quantities and prices of goods and factors of production and international trade, and how quantities and prices are affected by government intervention. The macroeconomic subjects include the determinants of economic growth, financial institutions, short-run fluctuations in output and employment, inflation, macroeconomics of the open economy, and the role of government policy.
Institution: Harvard University (Summer School)
Position: Teaching Assistant